Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11FEEDBACK TOOL-KIT 4. Some suggested methods for giving feedback Pendelton’s Model In 1984, Pendelton developed a model for giving feedback in the clinical education setting. The model can be applied to group or individual feedback on performance observed at first hand or on video. Using Pendelton’s model Strengths Difficulties 1. Check the learner is ready for feedback 2. Clarify any points of information/fact 3. Ask the learner what s/he did well – ensure that they identify the strengths of the performance and do not stray into weaknesses 4. Discuss what went well, adding your own observations (if there is a group observing the performance, ask the group what went well; again, keep them to the strengths 5. Ask the learner to say what went less well and what they would do differently next time 6. Discuss what went less well, adding your own observations and recommendations (if there is a group observing the performance, ask the group to add their observations and recommendations 7. Develop an action plan for improvement  Offers the learner the opportunity to evaluate their own practice and allows even critical points to be matters of agreement  Allows initial learner observations to be built upon by the observer(s)  Ensures strengths are given parity with weaknesses  Deals with specifics.  Is easier to use for inexperienced facilitators  It may be hard to separate strengths and weaknesses and though it sets out to protect the learner, it is rigid and artificial  Insisting upon this formula can interrupt thought processes and may cause the loss of important points. Feedback on areas of need is held back until part way through the session, although learners' may be anxious and wanting to explore these as a priority This may reduce the effectiveness of feedback on strengths  Holding four separate conversations about the same performance can be time consuming and inefficient. It can prevent more in-depth consideration of priorities SET-GO Model The SET-GO model was adapted from Kurtz et al. (1998) and uses an agenda-led, problem-based analysis for descriptive feedback. The model can be applied to group or individual feedback on performance observed at first hand or on video. Using SET-Go model Strengths Difficulties Feedback is based on: 1. What I Saw Descriptive, specific, non- judgemental. Facilitator to prompt if necessary with either or both of... 2. What Else did you see? What happened next in descriptive terms? 3. What do you Think? Reflecting back to the learner who is then given the opportunity to acknowledge and problem solve. Facilitator encourages problem solving 4. Can we clarify what Goal we would like to achieve? An outcome-based approach 5. Any Offers of how we should get there? Suggestions and alternatives are offered if possible.  By making feedback descriptive it becomes non-judgemental, specific and behaviour-directed  Is learner-led  Offers the learner an opportunity to reflect on their practice and to find solutions to problems  Empowers the learner and reduces defensiveness  It is more difficult for inexperienced facilitators who may struggle to ensure that feedback is balanced  It can lack the objectivity / specificity needed for developing the facilitators feedback skills